Fen Fern Unfurling

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Braken Fern.

I was challenged by a friend who wanted to know why I want to shoot film;  “All the new innovations are in digital photography”, he said. “Photochemistry is played out!”  True.  

I want to have a fuller understanding—because by understanding the limitations of film photography, you gain a deeper appreciation for digital photography.  By understanding the superiority of silver prints, you gain a goal for digital printing.  

The image above, while interesting, is really and truly crappy.  And to be honest, it would have been crappy even if it were large format film.  At 8 megapixels, an iPhone image does not stand up very well to cropping.  It pixelates easily, and efforts to smooth it digitally make it look like a bad attempt at being “painterly”.  If I’d captured this on film, I’d still have to deal with motion blur due to a slight breeze.  

Still, I’m making art in a wider array of mediums.  Film or pixels, there’s lessons to be learned from each. 

Four Hollows, Ozarks

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Reynolds County, Missouri. This lovely bit of bottom land is on the Clearwater Lake peninsula, and almost impossible to find unless you go exploring.  I’ll give a hint, though; There are faded plastic ribbons tied to the saplings at the junction of County Road 426 and this road.  Be prepared for steep grades, lots of rocks, and mosquitoes. Oh, and it’ll take a couple of turns to get to this spot.  

Have fun! 

From the Archives: Still life with pine cone

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An unexpected gift of pomegranates from my co-worker Connie, some windfall pears, a handful of autumn leaves and a pinecone places on a partially cut stump in autumn light. What could be better? Image taken in 2006.  A recent post on Facebook by Ray Santos made me go looking for this image. 

Montezuma’s Castle National Monument

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This remarkable cliff dwelling was never home of “Montezuma” (sic).  It predates that legendary Aztec emperor by at least 200 years.  It’s also far to the North of his reign.  It was built by people of the Sinagua (Spanish for ‘without water) culture.  It was inhabited for about 300 years, and abandoned about 800 years ago.  More recently, it was one of four sites to be the first to receive National Monument protection from President Theodore Roosevelt on December 8, 1906.  To learn more, go here:  Montezuma’s Castle National Monument